BOHO FOLK /

Summer 2015

las, the principles of a Bohemian culture spread far deeper than a simple fashion statement, Incorporating hedonism, liberation and confidence, Bohemian icons may be the people whose approach to life we most admire, but are likely too stiff-shirted to ever really emulate. Dylan Thomas, Hunter S Thomson, Patti Smith, Stevie Nicks...

Since it's inception (a time much debated but generally acknowledged as somewhere in the 1800's) the creative Bohemian culture prized the artist as her, with individual style of dress a key feature of self expression.

Though as a moverment not specific to any decade, it's with the 1970's that Boho style's most familiar associations lie (see team for our 70's inspired Boho selves). Proceding the hippie movement, 70's Boho took over where beatnik left off, turning nerd-glasses, striped t-shirts and straight leg turn-ups into plush tribal layers, fringes and cheesecloths, all worn with a delicately articulated careworn breeziness.

This time around the true spirit of Boho is questionable. (Are we feeling hedonistic? Liberal? Confident?) but in terms of fashion influence there are no doubts about both the 70's vide and the Boho elements that keep that decade stylish. Valentino for example, have collaborated with Celia Birtwell, a textile designer with a long heritage of pattern design for the queen's of Boho; also an exhibition focusing on Thea Porter is running at the Textile Museum. Porter was a hugely influential designer that brought the cultural richness of East Asian fabrics to early 70's London. The patterns that are keeping 2015's looking fresh are drawn from The Stans; Kazekstan, Uzbekistan, Turkistan, Afganistan. A progression from the tribal trends of the last two years, fabrics are infused with heavey stitching and authentic hand-embroidered techniques, worked in colours that sum up the richness of wild frontiers: mountain ranges, lush valleys, wild horses and files of poppies...

And of course no fashion era synonymous with the free spirit could exist without an abundance of denim! From skirts and dresses to vests and even dungarees! Interiors wise, the tapestry/embroidery is an easy aesthetic to work. I'm imagining a kind of 70's Laurel Canyon home, half minimalist, half Boho fantasy. With floor to ceiling windows looking out onto pine-clad hills; polished wood floors, demin wallpaper (ask for a quote and we'll print it on Digimura), with Suzani embroidered cushions, scattered liberally on a bay window-seat perfectly positioned to read poetry...

Now who's talking about romanticism?